Montreal Subway Testing Underground Wireless Service: 14 Stations Scheduled for 2014

by Istvan Fekete on April 16, 2014

The Société de transport de Montreal (STM), Bell, Rogers, Telus, and Videotron announced last year that they had joined forces to bring a cellular service to the subway system, both 3G and 4G LTE. The initiative was announced last September, and as it turns out, the carriers have been busy deploying the (most advanced wireless) network that was estimated to cost about $50 million.

The project includes a cellular service both in stations and tunnels within seven years. To cite Francois Gratton of Telus, who is co-ordinating the project, the carriers have set the benchmark high: they are aiming to bring underground the same high-quality experience users are accustomed to above ground.

Fast forward six months, and according to the Journal de Montreal, the progress is well advanced, and the STM has tightened deadlines. There are a couple of important aspects, though;, for example, more than 900,000 people ride the STM on a daily basis, and the majority of them depend on their cellular coverage.
[click to continue…]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • PDF
  • Ping.fm
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter
  • Wikio

{ 0 comments }

Mozilla Attempts to Pick up the Pieces, Appoints Interim CEO

by Matt Klassen on April 16, 2014

Mozilla has named company CMO Chris Beard as interim CEO as it attempts to recover from the firestorm of controversy surrounding the short and messy tenure of former CEO Brendan Eich. The hope is, of course, that Mozilla clients will quickly forget about the short-lived Eich era at the company, mitigating the effects of Eich’s political stance on the company’s technological future.

Beard is a long-time employee of Mozilla, taking a number of key leadership roles in product development, innovation, and marketing, including overseeing the development of Firefox for Android and the Firefox mobile operating system. He brings to the table knowledge of the mobile market and a strong vision for how Mozilla’s own mobile strategy (not to mention that he has no known controversial political affiliations).

But if its Mozilla’s hope that the controversy surrounding Eich’s stance on gay marriage will quietly disappear it seems such thinking is misguided, both because critics of Eich and the firm itself are still clamouring for an apology following Eich’s appointment and subsequent resignation and because it really shouldn’t be an issue Mozilla is focusing on at all, given that all it will really take for the firm to recover is a strong mobile product. Suffice it to say, hounded by controversy, losing ground in the browser segment, and still unsure of how to enact its mobile strategy, questions are being asked if, and how, Mozilla can survive.

[click to continue…]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • PDF
  • Ping.fm
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter
  • Wikio

{ 0 comments }

Incumbents Acting as an Oligopoly, Lethbridge Professor Says

by Istvan Fekete on April 15, 2014

You may recall the recent $5 price hike from Telus, Rogers, and Bell: citing various reasons, the incumbents have raised the price of new contracts by $5, while existing contracts remain unchanged. By the way, they have the right to make such increases whenever they want to. The best word to describe this situation in Canada is oligopoly, according to a professor.

“It’s the power of what we call an oligopoly,” said Michael Madore, a professor in the Faculty of Management at the University of Lethbridge. “Rogers, Telus and Bell are acting as an oligopoly. It’s very difficult for a new party to come in and gain presence,” Madore said.

“It’s really based on supply and demand of markets. As long as Canadians are not going to push this with the government you’re going to continue to see the rates go up, I think,” he said.
[click to continue…]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • PDF
  • Ping.fm
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter
  • Wikio

{ 0 comments }

T-Mobile Challenges Industry to Abolish Overage Fees

by Matt Klassen on April 15, 2014

For its next act the self-proclaimed UnCarrier T-Mobile wants to once again shake up the wireless world, this time challenging the mobile industry to abolish overage fees. As eccentric T-Mobile CEO John Legere explains, America’s fourth largest wireless carrier is “capping off several days of major announcements by launching a broad social campaign to abolish domestic overage penalties and begin a national conversation.”

In a blog post yesterday Legere said that he was committing his company to ending overage fees for all of its customers currently on a T-Mobile plan, and although this switch was made significantly easier on T-Mobile given its previous adoption of its Simple Choice plans—which all but eliminated such overages anyways—Legere noted that customers on older plans will be positively affected by the change as well.

But Legere’s attempt to right what he considers a grave injustice in the mobile world didn’t stop with his own company, as he has used this as an opportunity to drop the gauntlet against his competitors as well, challenging the likes of Verizon, AT&T, and Sprint to similarly abolish overage fees and embrace the freedom of the UnCarrier lifestyle.

[click to continue…]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • PDF
  • Ping.fm
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter
  • Wikio

{ 0 comments }

Investigating the Threat of the “Heartbleed” Bug

by Jeff Wiener on April 15, 2014

The online world was staggered last week when security researchers discovered a critical vulnerability in foundational security technology in the Internet’s core infrastructure. While there has been no lack of press about this new bug, ghoulishly dubbed “Heartbleed,” in a world where bugs, exploits, vulnerabilities, and hacks seem to be part of our daily life I’ve noted an amazingly casual response from the general public, prompting me to investigate this matter further to find out such how worried we need to be.

The flaw was found in an open source application of the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol, which is essentially “the most basic means of encrypting information on the Web.” SSL mitigates the risk of someone eavesdropping on your online activities, and OpenSSL, where this Heartbleed bug was discovered, is an open-source implementation of that SSL software, and sad to say, one that is widely employed across the Web.

Now if that still didn’t make any sense let me say this, while it may seem strange for companies, particularly huge multi-nationals, to use free open-source (publicly available and customizable) software for establishing a foundation for security and privacy on the Internet, that’s exactly what’s happened, and hackers have found a way to exploit an inherent flaw in it, meaning users’ sensitive personal information — including usernames, passwords, and credit card information — is now at a greater risk for being intercepted. So is this more serious than your average security flaw? You better believe it is.

[click to continue…]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • PDF
  • Ping.fm
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter
  • Wikio

{ 0 comments }

Amazon’s Forthcoming Smartphone Needs Attractive Price Point

by Matt Klassen on April 14, 2014

Rumours about Amazon’s impending entry in the smartphone market have been floating around for several years now, but even if such a phone comes with all the top end features there’s really only one way the ecommerce giant is going to find success in the cutthroat mobile sector, and that’s with price.

As CNET writers Roger Cheng and Donna Tam explain, “If the Seattle-based online retailing giant wants to make a mark in the smartphone world, as it is reportedly ready to do this fall, it should double-down on what it’s done so well in the past: offering a product that undercuts competitors.”

Simply put, while mind-bending 3D phones may seem like the wave of the future for the mobile industry the only way for Amazon to truly compete with established incumbents Apple and Samsung is to deliver high end affordability, if for no other reason than consumers will likely avoid a high-priced device branded with the Amazon name.

[click to continue…]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • PDF
  • Ping.fm
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter
  • Wikio

{ 0 comments }

Amazon Said to Be Releasing Smartphone in June, and Shipping in September

by Istvan FeketeApril 14, 2014

Rumours about Amazon’s smartphone have previously appeared sporadically in the past, with tech blogs speculating as to whether the online retail giant will make the move or not. Fact is, smartphone adoption is currently above 60% in the US, so you may well ask if the online retail giant would be able to secure a [...]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • PDF
  • Ping.fm
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter
  • Wikio
Read the full article →

Softbank Eyes Vodafone for Possible European Expansion

by Matt KlassenApril 11, 2014

Softbank is considering expansion into Europe should recalcitrant American antitrust regulators block the company’s proposed merger between itsUSsubsidiary Sprint and fellow wireless competitor T-Mobile, according to reports. In fact, Softbank may be creating a new rivalry with AT&T across the pond as sources indicate Softbank may be evaluating the possibility of acquiring UK carrier Vodafone. [...]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • PDF
  • Ping.fm
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter
  • Wikio
Read the full article →

Air Canada Begins Rollout of In-Flight Wi-Fi in May

by Istvan FeketeApril 11, 2014

Air Canada, the first Canadian carrier to provide customers with in-flight Wi-Fi, announced plans to roll out connectivity across its North American fleet in May, under an agreement with Gogo. The agreement will also provide for future type-testing of Gogo satellite solutions for Wi-Fi on international flights. The Canadian carrier currently has two Wi-Fi–equipped Airbus [...]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • PDF
  • Ping.fm
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter
  • Wikio
Read the full article →

Heartbleed Bug: The Chaotic Nature of the Internet Under the Magnifying Glass

by Istvan FeketeApril 10, 2014

A major security flaw in widely used encryption software was unveiled this week. For the majority of users, it shed light on the enduring and terrifying realities of the Internet: it is inherently chaotic, with nobody in charge of it all. For skeptics, it was another reason to spread their belief: never trust anything. The [...]

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • FriendFeed
  • LinkedIn
  • Live
  • PDF
  • Ping.fm
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter
  • Wikio
Read the full article →