Apple Defends its “Heroic” Commitment to American Job Creation

by Matt Klassen on March 14, 2012

An Apple Graphic Aptly Titled, "Hero"

While not quite at the stage that real estate mogul Donald Trump envisioned when he called on Apple CEO Tim Cook to relocate Apple’s entire supply line to American soil, in an effort to polish its recently sullied image regarding its employment standards the Cupertino tech giant recently unveiled a new page on its website detailing its impact on American job creation.

The website claims that Apple is responsible for 514,000 jobs in the U.S., a number which the company subsequently divided into two groups: 304,000 jobs directly related to Apple and its business partners, and another 210,000 jobs indirectly created by Apple through the company’s “App Economy.”

Being the sceptic that I am, however, I see these employment numbers as nothing short of a smokescreen, designed to turn the public’s attention to the great things Apple is doing here at home (don’t forget about the new iPad folks) and away from the human atrocities being committed overseas.

Smokescreen aside for the moment, taking a detailed look at the numbers humorously unveils the opposite of what Apple likely hoped for; the company has little direct impact on job creation at all. In its calculations regarding the number of jobs directly related to Apple, the company has basically counted anyone anywhere that may have had even the slightest connection to an Apple product, be it in manufacturing, transportation or sale.

But here’s the confusing thing, is Apple truly responsible for the employees at Corning, where one job among likely thousands is to make glass for Apple products, or at FedEx or UPS where people ship Apple products to stores? The truth is, if Apple didn’t exist, all these companies and likely all of their current employees still would, meaning that if Apple can justifiably claim responsibility for creating those jobs, why not just go ahead and claim responsibility for creating my job and the rest in the tech blogosphere as well? It would surely help bolster their numbers.

The one area where Apple should be given its due credit is the creation of the “App Economy.” As the website states, “With more than 550,000 apps and more than 24 billion downloads in less than four years, the App Store has created an entirely new industry: iOS app design and development.” This new Apple-centric industry conservatively employs 210,000 people, saying nothing about the developer jobs it has indirectly generated on other platforms by basically creating the entire app genre.

That said, such blatant propaganda truly has one purpose for Apple, to divert attention away from the company’s Foxconn supply chain in China and back to the happier story here at home, where hundreds of thousands of hard working Americans, who are well paid and absolutely delighted to be alive by the way, bring you the latest cutting edge technology. So, if you were experiencing some sort of ethical conundrum over whether you should support Apple and purchase the new iPad—produced at slave labour prices—don’t think twice about it, because you’ll be supporting so many of your fellow citizens…and isn’t that what being American is all about?

As a brief aside, I decided to choose the graphic available Apple’s new job creation webpage for this post, only to notice that the default name of this picture, detailing the 514,000 jobs Apple has helped generated, is ‘hero,’ because that’s why Apple truly is folks, a real American hero.

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Written by: Matt Klassen. www.digitcom.ca. Follow TheTelecomBlog.com by: RSS, Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube.

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