Canadians Shopping In-Store Validate Purchases by Reaching Out to a Trusted Person

by Istvan Fekete on February 24, 2015

Canadian shoppers in brick-and-mortar stores are using their mobile phones slightly differently from other nations, a study conducted in 23 countries by Gfk has found.

When asked what activities they regularly do on their mobile phones when shopping in brick-and-mortar stores, the answers were very different, but there are common behaviours globally. One of them is comparing prices, and just as in every other nation surveyed by Gfk, Canadians are using their smartphones to quickly compare prices.

The second-most-common behaviour was contacting a friend or family member for advice, while the third was taking pictures of products they might buy.

As it turns out, Canadians usually validate their purchase by getting in touch with a trusted person. If this was your choice, you are not alone, as 31% of Canadian respondents usually call a friend, or take an image of the product they plan to buy.

The Gfk study slightly contradicts earlier studies highlighting the convenience of checking a product’s price with other retailers while in-store: Only 23% of Canadians compare prices when shopping.

In a global comparison, Canada was reported as #14 for contacting friends and family, #12 for taking pictures, and #19 for comparing prices.

Breaking the figures down by gender, Gfk found that globally men are more likely than women to use their mobile phones in-store to regularly compare prices. About half of the adults aged between 20 and 29 check prices online frequently.

In Canada, however, men and women were almost evenly split: 24% of men and 22% of women compare prices, with the aforementioned age group reporting this behaviour.

When it comes to validating a purchase, Canadian women are more likely to call a trusted person, with 45% of young adults reporting this activity. Are you one of them?

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Written by: Istvan Fekete. www.digitcom.ca. Follow TheTelecomBlog.com by: RSS, Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube.

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