Requests for Customer Data Down, Rogers Transparency Report Reveals

by Istvan Fekete on April 10, 2015

Rogers’ latest transparency report shows that police are requesting far less customer information from carriers now that a warrant is required. As the Rogers’ 2014 Transparency Report reveals, the total number of law enforcement requests for customers’ names, addresses, and billing records fell from 174,917 in 2013 to 113,655 in 2014.

The report shows a huge drop in requests made without a warrant for customer names and addresses associated with a listed phone number or an IP address. Rogers claims it stopped providing this kind of information in June 2014 if no warrant was provided, although there are exceptions: emergency cases. They take emergency as defined in the Criminal Code.

Ken Enghelhart, Rogers’ chief privacy officer, says the company strengthened its policy after reviewing the court ruling and hearing concerns from customers.
Requests with warrants have also dropped slightly: Rogers received “only” 71,501 such requests in 2014, compared to 74,415 in 2013. These types of requests include detailed information such as payment history, billing records, and call records.

Rogers, which published its first transparency report last year, included two new types of information in this year’s edition:

  • The number of requests for the location or contact details of someone who calls 911 from a cellphone – 50,439, down from 55,900 in 2013.
  • The number of requests it refused, providing no customer information – 2,278

The number of requests from government agencies and departments under laws such as the Customs Act and the Income Tax Act also dropped, from 2,556 in 2013 to 2,315 in 2014, the Rogers transparency report reveals.

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Written by: Istvan Fekete. www.digitcom.ca. Follow TheTelecomBlog.com by: RSS, Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube.

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