AT&T, Sprint, Verizon, and T-Mobile 3G/4G Wireless Network Performance Compared

by Istvan Fekete on July 23, 2015

Wireless network speeds have received a significant amount of attention not just in the US and Canada, but also globally. One of the keyphrases frequently used in press releases and carrier announcements with regards to LTE has been “faster download speeds” compared to 3G networks.

However, another key factor for a better customer experience is latency speed. This is noteworthy because a number of operators have pointed to improved latency as a major enhancement that comes with LTE networks.

For example, when Verizon announced its LTE deployment in 2010, it said that “the user plane latency achieved in LTE is approximately 1/2 (one-half) of the corresponding latency in existing 3G technologies. This provides a direct service advantage for highly immersive and interactive application environments, such as multiplayer gaming and rich multimedia communications.”

To fully understand why latency is important, you need to understand what is means: Latency is defined as the time it takes for a source to send a packet of data to a receiver. It is measured in milliseconds, and, as you may have already guessed, the lower the latency, the better the network performance.

In a partnership with FierceWireless, OpenSignal has released its quarterly report, shedding some light on the wireless network performance of the four biggest carriers.

Compared to last year, AT&T shows a slight jump in latency speeds on its LTE network in the second quarter of this year, but Sprint shows some of the lowest latency figures. As it turns out, Sprint and T-Mobile take the crown in terms of latency speeds in the second quarter, and therefore offer the best wireless networks in the US.

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Written by: Istvan Fekete. www.digitcom.ca. Follow TheTelecomBlog.com by: RSS, Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube.

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