Bell Launches North America’s First Tri-Band LTE-A Technology with Speeds up to 290 Mbps

by Istvan Fekete on August 17, 2015

Using the publicity surrounding the official launch of the latest Samsung smartphones, Bell announced last week North America’s first rollout of a Tri-band LTE-A (LTE Advanced) network service, which delivers lightning-fast mobile data speeds of up to 290 Mbps.

Samsung has officially unveiled its latest forays into the phablet market, the Galaxy Note 5 and the S6 Edge+. Both smartphones have a stunning super AMOLED, quad HD, 5.7-inch display and incorporate a Category-9 modem, so Bell’s announcement has come just in time.

But this isn’t a new strategy: Bell touted its first implementation of carrier aggregation, which combines two bands in the downlink to achieve theoretical speeds of up to 225 Mbps, when the Galaxy S6 was launched five months ago.

Now, Bell customers who opt for the latest Samsung phablets when they become available on August 21 can benefit from the speeds provided by the first Tri-band LTE-A. To achieve such speeds, Bell combines AWS and PCS, and in Southern Ontario and Halifax where it acquired 12 MHz of C-block spectrum, its 700 MHz frequency. The result: up to 290 Mbps download speeds.

Bell has been busy lately upgrading its network in an attempt to live up to its claim of being the fastest wireless carrier in Canada. Tri-band LTE-A will be available in Halifax, Hamilton, Oakville, and Toronto as soon as the two new Samsung phablets hit the stores, but coverage will continue to expand. Bell’s coverage currently stands at 93% of the population, with data speeds ranging from 75 Mbps to 150 Mbps (expected average download speeds of 12 to 40 Mbps). Targeting coverage of more than 98% by the end of 2015, Bell is extending its LTE service to small towns and remote communities, including Canada’s North.

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Written by: Istvan Fekete. www.digitcom.ca. Follow TheTelecomBlog.com by: RSS, Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube.

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