More than 30% of US Children First Play with a Mobile Device While in Diapers

by Istvan Fekete on October 7, 2015

In the wake of the accelerated pace of digital innovation, which obviously affects our lives as well as parenting, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated its guidelines for parents. Actually, they had two pretty reasons to do that: (1) their 2011 policy statement, “Media Use by Children Younger Than Two Years”, was drafted prior to the first-generation iPad , and (2) today more than 30% of US children first use a mobile device when they are still in diapers, according to recent research published by Common Sense Media.

Furthermore, as we previously reported, 75% of teenagers (13–17 year olds) have smartphones and 24% admit to using the device almost constantly, according to the Pew Research Center.

In the light of the above, the AAP has updated its policy statement, emphasizing once again that their guidelines aren’t just based on the precautionary principle but on hard data and research.

The updated guidelines carry the following message to parents seeking professional advice on managing technology in their children’s lives: Media is just another environment, as children are doing the same things they have always done, only virtually, and like any other environment media can have positive and negative effects.

In the era of digital citizenship, parenting remains unchanged: The same rules apply to the children’s real and virtual environments. The children need their parents to play with them. You, as a parent, set the limits, because kids need them. Also, family participation with media facilitates social interaction and leaning; so play a video game with your kids.

We hand-picked a few from the updated guidelines. For the full list you can visit the AAP website.

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Written by: Istvan Fekete. www.digitcom.ca. Follow TheTelecomBlog.com by: RSS, Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube.

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